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Monday, 03 December 2018 18:02

Piercings, and Goatees, and Tats! Oh My!

It was Q&A time after a speech I’d just made to a large audience of small business owners, in a somewhat conservative retail field. As the speech featured some tips on how to be successful engaging younger workers (hint: “Complain that they aren’t like Baby Boomers” was not one of the tips), I wasn’t too surprised by this question:

 “What do you do about these kids who want to wear beards, nose rings, and tattoos?”

As is often the case, the best answers come not from the speaker, but from the audience. A hand shot up near the back of the room, and the fiftysomething woman attached thereto offered, “Well, I’ll tell you what we did at our company. We decided to get over it. Best decision we could ever have made.”

She went on to say, “We’d had this rule, since, like forever. No facial hair. No visible tattoos. No piercings except earrings. And only two. If you were female. None for the guys.

By Richard Hadden, with Eric Yarham

Let's start with this: I am not, like some members of my generation, a Pokémon Go hater.

In fact, I've played it. And I think it's kinda cool. There are many things worse than moving off the couch, breathing some fresh air, and discovering places in your community you didn't know existed. A library in my area has seen an uptick in visits from teens since the game's launch. I think that's cool, too.

But while playing, I couldn't escape the comparisons between Pokémon hunting and the search for talent at work, both when it's done well, and when it's bungled...

Monday, 21 March 2016 22:38

Listening… Really Listening

By Bill Catlette

Recently, I came uncomfortably close to dying in a well-equipped, modern, metropolitan hospital emergency room, a building that I had walked into under my own power. The cause of the near death experience was preventable. It had nothing to do with staffing shortages, Obamacare, or a packed emergency department. Rather, it had a lot to do with listening, specifically the lack thereof. Listening, really listening.